2011 / Q3 News Briefs

Workers conduct "pre-emptive" offsite clean up

JERSEY CITY, N.J., Aug. 30, 2011 – Workers cleaned up as much as 75 gallons of discolored water discovered across the street from the Garfield Avenue Site during an inspection to assess the possibility of off-site impacts caused by Hurricane Irene. Conditions on the clean-up site revealed no hurricane-related issues.

The discolored water was found yesterday morning near the intersection of Halladay Street and Carteret Avenue. A vacuum truck was used to remove discolored water and sediments from paved areas and from nearby catch basins. Results from tests conducted on samples of the water are expected to be available later this week.

"Rather than wait, we went ahead and did a pre-emptive cleanup to ensure the highest level of safety on site and in the area," said Mike McCabe, the independent, court-appointed site administrator overseeing PPG's chromium cleanups. "Because we took action, this incident posed no risk to residents."

As an added precaution, PPG will clean Carteret Avenue from Garfield to Halladay, including the intersection with Halladay. Cleaning will be done with a street sweeper, pressure washers and brooms. A vacuum truck will be used to remove excess cleaning water. Areas along the side of Carteret Avenue where puddles of discolored water were observed will then be paved.

Carteret between Garfield and Halladay will remain closed until the street cleaning and paving is complete. The Jersey City Fire Department's hazardous materials team evaluated and approved PPG's immediate response. In addition, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection approved PPG's cleanup plan.

Though the site remained secure during and after the storm, McCabe said it appears that the potentially contaminated ground water was brought to the surface by the nearly 9 inches of rain associated with Hurricane Irene, which flooded portions of Carteret Avenue.


Workers conduct "pre-emptive" offsite clean up

JERSEY CITY, N.J., Aug. 30, 2011 – Workers cleaned up as much as 75 gallons of discolored water discovered across the street from the Garfield Avenue Site during an inspection to assess the possibility of off-site impacts caused by Hurricane Irene. Conditions on the clean-up site revealed no hurricane-related issues.

The discolored water was found yesterday morning near the intersection of Halladay Street and Carteret Avenue. A vacuum truck was used to remove discolored water and sediments from paved areas and from nearby catch basins. Results from tests conducted on samples of the water are expected to be available later this week.

"Rather than wait, we went ahead and did a pre-emptive cleanup to ensure the highest level of safety on site and in the area," said Mike McCabe, the independent, court-appointed site administrator overseeing PPG's chromium cleanups. "Because we took action, this incident posed no risk to residents."

As an added precaution, PPG will clean Carteret Avenue from Garfield to Halladay, including the intersection with Halladay. Cleaning will be done with a street sweeper, pressure washers and brooms. A vacuum truck will be used to remove excess cleaning water. Areas along the side of Carteret Avenue where puddles of discolored water were observed will then be paved.

Carteret between Garfield and Halladay will remain closed until the street cleaning and paving is complete. The Jersey City Fire Department's hazardous materials team evaluated and approved PPG's immediate response. In addition, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection approved PPG's cleanup plan.

Though the site remained secure during and after the storm, McCabe said it appears that the potentially contaminated ground water was brought to the surface by the nearly 9 inches of rain associated with Hurricane Irene, which flooded portions of Carteret Avenue.